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20121201
20121231
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KQED (PBS) 13
WHUT (Howard University Television) 10
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 2:30pm PST
: please welcome at pbs.org. back to this program. -- please welcome wole soyinka back to the program. he is now a president -- a professor in residence, and he is the author of a new text, "of africa." >> thank you very much. tavis: you were tired of this nonsense that africans are inferior in a variety of ways. are we beyond that? >> i think it is an exaggeration to say that is why i wrote it. and number of reasons. it was to express my astonishment. it was totally mine blowing. i just mention that as one of the in ciliary -- one of the ancillary. i find a lot of crises tend to generate from east to west and cristian and islam. and there are what i call the invisible religions. lessons to teach the world. tavis: how do this to stand in their version religions play themselves out? >> yes, a very good question. look at somalia. look at more tanya. -- and more tanya -- look at another country. we would have thought africa is immune. in many ways, african religions, the world views, the perceptions have managed. the extremism in parts of the world, costing billions of lives, literally,
PBS
Dec 11, 2012 2:30pm PST
. i was always good in school and good at reading. this was the first one that got me. this was my first favorite book. i got my license and put it, dashboard and that sounds incredibly t c. -- put it on my dashboard and that sounds incredibly cheesy. it opened a lot of doors. tavis: what resonated with you personally? >> it is that point. there are not very many defined years for everyone. it is not the same for everyone. when you look up and go, i can choose my surroundings, i can choose the people that i surround myself with. i am not substantially in this place. some people are comfortable being uncomfortable. some people want to question five people that poll -- and find people that pull. need to find need to fin people like that. people who are sort of comfortable. people who revel in going crazy and fallen to lines that are not expected or conventional ones. a wide to discover america. it sounds incredibly cheesy but it is true. tavis: i read this book in high school. you signed up to play this when you're 17 and this book called "twilight"it's in the way. making records and
PBS
Dec 21, 2012 2:30pm PST
about it, because i was sitting at the same table as him at this state dinner for david cameron, and i said, when you guys get time to watch tv? you are supposed to be running the free world. he said michelle takes the kids out to play tennis. i do a little work at home, and sometimes i do not do so much work and i switch on the tv and watch homeland. he does not watch it with the girls. tavis: presidents need entertainment, too. >> saturday afternoon. tavis: was that your first state dinner? >> it may be my last. tavis: what did you think about the way we do state dinners? >> it was unbelievable. my wife and i looked at our table card, cable 20, and we said, that is ok. the revolving door will hit us repeatedly, but we sat down, and it was like a social occasion. it was very informal. once you were sat down, the tables were very mixed. i had warren buffett on my left , and the president told an interesting story about giving one of his ties because the tie torn. bit wor he gave one and said, when you have dinner with the president of the united states, you need to have a proper tie on
PBS
Dec 10, 2012 2:30pm PST
just artists in there with him, at different times. he really kept a tight. tavis: he is referenced in your work. how did you come together? >> i write about harry bosch, who has overcome his own obstacles. and he loves jazz. i would pick artists that had the same kind of journey, in a way. his clever guy is frank. i guess that got to him. he found out about it. we have mutual friends that put us together. there was a master class in saxophone. we had just started doing that when he got sick and he passed away. hopefully, this zone will do his idea, and go into schools. tavis: this is for theatrical release? >> we want to see what we have got. that is the best thing. it would get out on video. tavis: i will come forward to the book, "the black box." when i saw the title, i thought, as you might imagine, "an airplane crashed." i thought that would be what harry bosch would investigate. >> it is a metaphor. the black box holds the information and all the flight aeronautics. if there is a crash, the can figure out what happened. harry bosch think there is a black box, metaphorically, a
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 2:30pm PST
from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: he is a professor of risk engineering at nyu's polytechnic institute and author of two best-selling texts. his latest is called "antifragile." nassim nicholas taleb joins us tonight from washington. professor, good to have you back on this program. >> thank you for inviting me. tavis: i want to get into the book. let me start with the news of the day. everybody in washington is talking about the fiscal cliff. the so-called fiscal cliff. they're not talking to each other at the moment. that is what the conversation is going to get to, how do we avoid going over the so-called fiscal cliff? you suggested that the fiscal cliff might be good. i got a chance to go through your book. i understand, i think, why you might feel that way. the book argues that we need disorder to develop. we need disorder in our world to develop. we will come back to the book in a moment. based upon the motion -- that notion, why might the fiscal cliff be a good thing? >> we have been stuck for four years in a state of complacency. nobody wants to do anything about the a
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 2:30pm PST
. i want to bounce back and forth, if i can. >> the character jack, at the beginning of the film, is a radio host in toronto. the show is called "the truth." he is trying to bring attention to situations in society that are untruthful. , but his past is one that is very dark. if he was involved in the cia he says in the movie that he has done things that are unforgivable and unforgettable. he is trying to get amends -- somehow make amends for that in his life. it is an impossible thing to do. according to the things he did -- he will never be able to make amends. but at least he has to try. thrown into this emotional baggage this character has comes this issue that has to do with forrest whitacker and eva longoria's character. forrest is a head of a peasant movement in south america. years before, i was responsible for putting him in jail for 10 years. he has been labeled an ego terrorist by a country -- company controlling the water rights. tavis: an ecoterrorist. >> there is a big break up. they end up killing a lot of people, quarantining areas, getting rid of the population. he g
WETA
Dec 19, 2012 1:30am EST
go to europe. i am at my house on line and a headline pops up that says marcus miller in fatal switzerland bus crash. i am at my house, and i screamed. i had just talked to you, i had seen you days prior. i could not believe you had died in a bus crash. the driver of the bus did die. what was going on in switzerland. >> we had just finished and monte carlo, the jazz festival. at the show, we had a long trek to holland. that is about 3:00, 4:00 in the morning. i am starting to come up, and i feel like it is vertigo. the impact causes the bus to fall on its side. from all the people here, crashing into people, it was pretty crazy. after a while, the rescue workers came and got us. the guy was like 23 years old, these guys that are amazingly talented. i was terrified. i thought it would prevent them from playing or whatever. ours is going from guide to die. let me see you move your lips. where is the other driver? he did not make it. it was horrible. in my situation, it is really difficult. i was glad that the other guys are ok. everybody is home and recuperating. tavis: those of
PBS
Dec 26, 2012 2:30pm PST
about that? i love this book. >> ah, look at you segue! look at you segue! you must do this for a living, baby! tavis: [laugh] 20 years, i been working at it. i really do love the title, though, "my brave year of firsts: tries, sighs and high fives." this is your 10th one. >> i know. tavis: does it feel like 10? >> well, look, i'm barely out of high school. i got 840 combined on my sats, combined. tavis: you beat me. >> no, i did not. i did not. therefore, the idea that at some point in my life i would end up an author of books for children is and was a kind of crazy idea that would never have been in my game plan, not that i have a game plan. yes, 10 books 20 years later, it's an astonishing experience for me. tavis: where'd the idea for the first one come from? >> my little girl. tavis: how did you get in this lane? >> i was an actor for hire. i was married, you know, to this really interesting guy. tavis: 28 years now. >> i know, coming up december. my four-year-old, my annie, walked into my room -- swear, walked into my office. i was sitting at my desk and she walked in and went, "wh
PBS
Dec 3, 2012 2:30pm PST
in baseball, where they have the pinch hitter, let us have an expert come in who is good at rendering. he can come in and do my banter, and then leave, and i will play the song. mr. to doing that, and it was just such a dumb idea. but it really made us laugh. we actually did a whole tour. who would have comedians doing our banter for us. tavis: how did the fan base react? >> i think they liked it. i think it had an interesting effect on people who, when they left. michael and i, our songs can be serious or depressing. when people laugh, their attention is almost more focused on the music. after laughing. i am not sure why that is. it was interesting. when it was a really nice experience. tavis: what you have against charmers? >> i actually love charming people. i am fascinated by them, because i think it is a skill that i do not have. i do not really know. i feel very awkward making conversation with people. i and the people who can stroll into a room and have anecdotes, and get the punch line in the right place, which i can never do. and make people feel at ease, and make p
PBS
Dec 24, 2012 2:30pm PST
, the funerals. that just does not come to mind at all. i guess i am blessed that way. tavis: how do you not think about the death of your brother? how do you repress those thoughts about your brother? >> after he died, i thought i would never get over it. then i started thinking about him a little more than i was thinking about me. thing.a very selfish dai they say in the bible you are supposed to rejoice when people die and mourn when they are born, because it is one of the most painful at sea go through in life is being born, and dying -- i do not know, but i believe -- i do not know. you have got to have a name. >> i only go here because you talk about it in the book. you tell a painful story about the last conversation with your brother before he passed away. how painful was it to relive that story? >> not as much as it used to be. like i was saying, at first it was worse than a broken heart. he was not only my brother. he was my mentor. he was like a father figure. i came to the conclusion i probably leaned on him a little too much, and somehow i got it turned around, and now s
PBS
Dec 17, 2012 2:30pm PST
they hear styles and the clothes. there was an exhibit that opens in january. >> at the african-american museum in philadelphia. tavis: are we going to see some of this on display? >> one of the evidence i was telling you was burned up in mexico city. -- of its i was telling you about was bird apply in mexico city. one was stolen. the ones i have been on exhibit. they have been on exhibit for eight years on the -- and the rock-and-roll hall of fame museum has carried them. they have been all around the world. they opened up at the victoria and albert museum in london. that is so great. "edgown that we'v wore on sullian show," the array of colors are beautiful. they're in pretty good condition. it has been 50 years. tavis: tell me about the fashion, about the hair, the clothes. so much of the image of the supremes how to do with not just the sound but the look and you work that thing. >> we all loved glamour. we really did. we were playing dress up in our moms' clothes. a lot of people like lena horne we looked at as children and young girls and the glamour is what we wanted to d
WETA
Dec 18, 2012 12:00am EST
a cross that the children at st. andrew's presbyterian made. that is the star of bethlehem and the chute of jesse. we bake them in the oven. this is the burleigh one, the roses, the animating love of the universe. -- the girly one, the roses, the animating love of the universe. tavis: my mother watches this show every night. >> where did you put that across? tavis: i will bring it home for christmas, mom. ♪ i'll be home for christmas ♪ >> get over-excited. tavis: i do that. i want to get right into this. i wanted to just read a passage and let you take it from there, from each of these three sections. help, thanks, wow. from the help section -- before i do that, why these three words? >> i always used help and thanks after i got sober in 1986. everything was, help, because your mind is so crazy. all of your best ideas are coming out. i would go, help, help me. i would always be heard. the phone would ring, the male would come. something would shift. i would be ok again. thank you, thank you. like, i am back. then about 15 years ago, maybe more, i realized that all you had to do
PBS
Dec 14, 2012 2:30pm PST
viewers like you. thank you. tavis: dr. linda bradley is the founder of a program aimed at women of color called celebrate sisterhood. i read a piece that you wrote: 10 ways to put your doctor at of business and i was fascinated by what i saw and i thought to ask you. whether or not doctors really want to be put up of business and you know where i am going. there is so much money that is made in the medical profession. i wonder not to cast a person -- aspersion on you but how serious are wary about getting to a point where people do not need hospitals, they do not need doctors. they do not need the kinds of medical insurance we have. can you imagine a time when we will get to a place where we will be so healthy that we can put doctors out of business? >> i am optimistic that we can do that. doctors would relish the opportunity to take care of patients, to be looking at preventive ways to promote health. if you look at the new oath we take, it is modified. but of the cleric oath says i prefer to take care of patients for prevention. rather than cure and that food be thy medicine. i am sad
WHUT
Dec 28, 2012 7:00pm EST
: yeah. all right, so let us explore this, shall we? >> yes. tavis: what is the -- i heard at a script and you say "interesting role, i want to do this." >> yeah. tavis: but there must be something here that draws you to -- >> to back then. tavis: yeah >> i think it is the element of fantasy, actually. i think it is the fact that you can kind of -- you leave everything you know behind you. you leave yourself, you leave your society, you leave your country, and you just connect with it on a totally emotional level. i find that really interesting. it is a world that's rules you do not know, so the rules can be created, so the drama can always be created, and kind of almost freed within that. i quite like it as a kind of dramatic conceit. i find it an interesting way to draw myself in and to draw people in. i guess it is something to do with that. tavis: yeah, i get it. i will take that. >> ok, thanks, whew, that's lucky. ok. tavis: yeah, i accept that. i read this in my research for our conversation. i could be wrong, so if i am wrong, you just tell me that i am wrong and we'll move on.
WETA
Dec 29, 2012 12:00am EST
this film, because there's so many human dynamics and issues at work in this project. i think at the center of the movie, as i see it, at least, is the struggle that so many human beings have between power and humanity. are you willing to give up the power to hold on to your humanity? would that be an accurate description? >> yeah. i'm happy with that, but i think there's a sub -- tavis: sure. >> -- concept of that, is that we -- i don't know about you, but i don't meet many people that are evil. i meet human beings who are flawed, who are mentally ill and have enormous problems, but i don't think i've ever met someone who was a totally dark energy that had no humanity or sense of love or affection for anything in their life. that's very rare. but i think that as human beings we tend to compartmentalize, and we have a selective morality based on the situation we're in. and i think that's a very modern thing. it's a problem we have and that we cheat on our taxes and maybe we have a mistress on the side, but in this other area we're totally honest and straightforward and have a moral p
PBS
Dec 25, 2012 2:30pm PST
recently, but it's gut. it's like you look at a table of food and you think, "i think i want an apple." at just that moment, you want an apple, and the next day, it might be, "i want a little bit of that ham or a bit of that beefsteak or whatever." i think, if you listen to yourself, listen to your instincts and follow them, which is what i try to do both in my work and in my life, then you read a script and you think, yeah, i want to do it. i'm not really sure why. i mean, of course, who the director is makes a difference. how well it's written makes a difference. whether they're going to pay you or not makes a difference. [laughter] tavis: you used a wonderful phrase a moment ago, a simple phrase, but a wonderful phrase, the phrase "listen to," if you listen to yourself. one of the things aside from your immense talent as an actor, one of the things that i most enjoy about you is your sound, that voice of yours. when i'm not doing this, i have a publishing company. we publish books and oftentimes these days, of course, these books are >> speaking books. tavis: books on tape. e
WHUT
Dec 6, 2012 7:00pm EST
like it. three or four months. at 12:00, if there was not magic happening in the studio, i was, like, "let's pick it up tomorrow." i started a little earlier. i can trust bennett understand how things are unfolding. you do not have to beat your head against the wall, which is what i kind of used to do, and there is more of a freedom. i experience more life. more love. more capacity. the creation process was more open. that is why i combined with so many people, because i wanted to do things i had never done before. i needed to do things i had not done before. tavis: stevie wonder's daughter, and when i see her, there are so many people that are amazed that she is the one. they are amazed. what you have done with egypt, what is going to happen 20 years from now. >> money, leave me alone. -- mommy, leave me alone. tavis: for those who do not know why you name him egypt, and there is a reason behind it. >> in 2007 or so, i went through a tough time. i think i grew up really fast. i grew up really fast in this fast-paced business. i didn't understand how to take a break, recover, and i p
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)